Living among what’s left behind
2019
Editorial



Client: Nomad — Viagens e Aventura
Edited by: Manifesto
Author: Mário Cruz

Production: Maiadouro
Cover production: Vivalab
Thank you to: Daniel Pereira for his precious help with the map.
Photography: Bruno Nacarato

*This project was designed as studio Degrau, along with 3 brilliant friends: Ana Areias, João Castro and Tiago Campeã.

Living Among What’s Left Behind
2019
Living Among What’s Left Behind is the photographic project of the photojournalist Mário Cruz, who spent 1 month in the margins of Manila’s river Pasig, documenting its reality.
The Philippine river was declared biologically dead in the 1990’s due to a combination of industrial pollution and waste, dumped by communities that don’t have sanitation infrastructures, representing an enormous social and ecological warning for the world.



Images from Mário Cruz’s work in Manilla. 
Pasig was considered one of the 20 most polluted rivers in the world and it’s the source of 63,700 tons of plastic that is deposited into the ocean each year. Although efforts are being made to clean up the river, in some parts waste is still so dense that is possible to walk on top of the garbage.

On his journey, Mário got to know the reality of people that live on the river margins, on sheds under the multiple highway bridges, collecting garbage and selling it for a living.



The book was meant to confront people with this reality, to create awareness and possibly lead them into action. It portrays this reality from an individual’s perception, showing how small bits of trash left behind by each person led to a catastrophic situation of a whole society, whose irresponsible and unsustainable behaviours resulted in a public health issue for future generations throughout the entire planet.

During its design process, we felt the obligation to do more than just layout the story. However, to produce a book without creating more waste was one of the biggest challenges.
Instead of following into conventional printing production processes, we chose to develop an object that represents the roughness and aggression of this reality and, at the same time, focus on a more positive and solution-sided approach.